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20121205
20121205
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and risk defaulting on its loans early next year. house speaker john boehner today said, quote, we don't have time for the president to continue shifting the goal posts. we need to solve this problem. danielle lee now joins us from capitol hill with more on this story tonight. danielle? >> reporter: jim, good evening. we're just now learning that president obama spoke to house speaker john boehner by phone this afternoon. but we're not hearing of any progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff or on raising the nation's debt ceiling which is currently at $16.4 trillion. there are new concerns about what could happen to the country's credit rating in the new year. each day toward the fiscal cliff is also another day closer to the country maxing out on its borrowing limit. president obama talked to business leaders today. >> the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for as a weapon is to destroy your credit rating. >> reporter: he's worried republicans may re newsto raise the country's debt ceiling to get their way on spending cuts and risk defaulting on the country's loans. >> that is a ba
, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan reles on .2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from ta
tougher in going after speaker john boehner's latest proposal in saying it simply doesn't add up. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> the bottom line is the president and speaker boehner have not spoken now in several days. so there is really no signs of progress. there has been some discussion that look that's just happening in public. behind closed doors maybe they are gaining some ground, i have spoken to some top white house officials tonight some top republicans on the hill they say in private they are not making progress either, shep. >> shepard: republicans say they have offered some compromises. >> they have in the sense that speaker boehner with his policy late yesterday put $100 billion in new tax revenue on the table. that was a concession by him but not far enough as you noted for the white house because the white house wants him to not just raise tax revenue by limiting intuctions and loopholes and the like. they want to see tax rates go up but republic lea
complain the new proposal from house speaker john boehner is too vague about tax increases even as it lays out a tough package of spending cuts. for instance raising medicare's eligibility age for the first time in the program's history most likely by two years from 65 to 67 the move would not apply to americans who are close to retirement now. it would be phased in for younger workers such as maggie, a virginia health club manager who just turned 50 last month. >> i think the biggest factor for me is when are you going to retire so you lose your insurance from work and if it goes to 67 you have this two- year gap. what are you going to do? >> reporter: when medicare was created in 1966, the average life expectancy for men was 67 years, today it's 76 and women live on average to 81. one recent study by the kaiser family foundation estimated that shifting medicare eligibility from 65 to 67 would save the federal government $5.7 billion a year. 65 and 66-year-olds would pay an extra $3.7 billion a year to ensure themselves. the employers would pay billions more. >> it would finally bankrupt
emanuel has more. reporter: hello, jenna. speaker john boehner says the republicans made a good-faith effort to avert a fiscal crisis. they say essentially this is now time for the president to be getting involved to respond to the republican offering. he claims that the republican offer was balanced, and because republicans cannot just sit there and negotiate with themselves. here's more from the top republican leaders a short time ago. >> i will be here and i will be available at any moment. so, the president and get serious about solving this problem. reporter: they asked the president sit down so we can stop wasteful spending in washington. on the democratic side, there is emphasis that congress should pass the middle-class tax cuts for people earning up to $250,000 per year. to give those people economic certainty. here is more from nancy pelosi making her case. >> i consider what the republicans agree with the tax cut, but that will be a victory for the american people, and that is why we are here. i would hope that would break the fall of the fiscal cliff, which is becomi
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)